Thinning the first fruit on your Fruit Salad Tree

October 03, 2018

Thinning the first fruit on your Fruit Salad Tree

When your Fruit Salad Tree begins to bear its first fruit, it's a momentous occasion! You'll be tempted to sit back and let your tree continue to develop its array of different fruit, however, it's best to let the tree use its energy to grow sturdy framework rather than letting the  new fruit pull down the young branches.

Selectively removing young fruits on your fruit tree is called thinning. 

The first fruits on your Fruit Salad Tree will appear anywhere between six and 18 months. Remove these fruits when they're the size of a pea to allow your tree to use the energy to grow and develop a sturdy framework, which needs to be ahead of any fruit production.

More fruit may be allowed to set on faster-growing grafts, but always reduce fruit on slower growing grafts to balance your tree. Dane shows us how to balance your young tree here.

You may like to train your grafts to grow in a certain fashion. Read more about training your tree with stakes here. Did you know that you can also espalier any Fruit Salad Tree? Espalier your fruit tree by attaching the branches to wires or along a lattice framework, creating a fan shape which results in faster growth. Read more about espaliering your Fruit Salad Tree here.

Here are some of our customers Fruit Salad Tree growing photos.

We stock a wide range of Fruit Salad Trees, which all boast different fruit on the same tree. Each fruit variety retains its own flavour, appearance and ripening time. We graft citrus, stonefruit and multi-apple trees. 

Our fast fruiting trees can be grown in the ground, or in pots on your balcony.

Shop our wide range of trees now and check out our current specials here!




Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Growing Tips

Watering your fruit salad tree in drought conditions
Watering your fruit salad tree in drought conditions

January 24, 2020

It is extremely difficult to keep gardens well watered in drought conditions, and fruit trees are particularly thirsty plants. Here are some tips to make sure that your fruit tree has adequate water to survive these Australian conditions!

Continue Reading

How to check your fruit tree's soil is healthy
How to check your fruit tree's soil is healthy

November 25, 2019

If your Fruit Salad Tree is not looking as vivacious as it should be, then it may have something to do with the soil conditions that it is getting its growing nutrients from.  It is always good practice, to take a sample before you fertilise to ensure your tree gains all of the benefits from the application. 

Knowing your pH levels are important as certain nutrients are absorbed at various pH levels and different plants benefit from different amounts of nutrients. To do a pH reading...

Continue Reading

Cara Cara Blood Orange growing on a Fruit Salad Tree - a multi grafted citrus tree in Australia
Fruit in Focus - Cara Cara Blood Navel (also known as Ruby Navel)

November 15, 2019

Cara Cara Blood Navels are a great citrus fruit variety to consider for your Fruit Salad Tree. They are a great addition to your garden and for you with numerous health benefits. The Cara Cara Blood Navel Orange has a deep pink flesh with an irresistible sweet flavour. It is a seedless variety that can grow quite large. Cara Cara oranges are full of beneficial goodness for your body; they contain vitamin A, folate, Lycopene (a powerful antioxidant) and of course Vi...

Continue Reading

Welcome to Fruit Salad Trees!

Join our email list for 10% off your first order and all the tree care advice you need to grow different fruits on one tree and keep the whole household happy!